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Today 31 news :


  • The impact of fintech on cross-border payments, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Finextra Research Payments channel :: RSS
    In a new staff discussion note, the IMF examines the fintech revolution, with a focus on the use of... Read more
  • The impact of fintech on cross-border payments, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Finextra Research Online banking channel :: RSS
    In a new staff discussion note, the IMF examines the fintech revolution, with a focus on the use of... Read more
  • gmaxwell commented on pull request bitcoin/bitcoin#10637, par gmaxwell, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: gmaxwell’s Activity :: RSS
    Jun 20, 2017 gmaxwell commented on pull request bitcoin/bitcoin#10637 I don't have much of a concern here about the 0/negative effective value inputs: Failing to select negative effective value inputs for an exact mat… Read more gmaxwell
  • gmaxwell commented on pull request bitcoin-core/secp256k1#461, par gmaxwell, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: gmaxwell’s Activity :: RSS
    Jun 20, 2017 gmaxwell commented on pull request bitcoin-core/secp256k1#461 You need a heapify: repeated insert is O(N log N) instead of O(N). While working on this before I came up with an optimization that halved the numb… Read more gmaxwell
  • Microsoft is working on providing digital IDs to over 1 billion undocumented people around the world (MSFT), 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop RSS :: RSS
    Microsoft is teaming up with Accenture to build a digital ID network using blockchain technology, as part of a United Nations-supported project to provide legal identification to 1.1 billion people worldwide with no official documents. The companies unveiled a prototype of the network on Monday at the UN headquarters in New York during the second summit of ID2020, a public-private consortium promoting the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goal of providing legal identity for everyone on… Read more
  • Microsoft is working on providing digital IDs to over 1 billion undocumented people around the world (MSFT), 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop - bitcoin :: RSS
    Microsoft is teaming up with Accenture to build a digital ID network using blockchain technology, as part of a United Nations-supported project to provide legal identification to 1.1 billion people worldwide with no official documents. The companies unveiled a prototype of the network on Monday at the UN headquarters in New York during the second summit of ID2020, a public-private consortium promoting the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goal of providing legal identity for everyone on… Read more
  • How To Buy Bitcoin: A Guide For Beginners, par StevePrentice, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: ValueWalk » Bitcoin :: RSS
    Here is a simple guide on How To Buy Bitcoin: Bitcoin is a virtual type of currency that is owned by no government, bank or nation. It is steadily increasing in value as more and more people purchase it, and slowly, certain businesses are starting to accept it. But it remains highly volatile, and this alone makes it impractical as a tool of commerce. However, these are early days. The world is turning to face technologies like Bitcoin and the blockchain that makes it work, and many of the world’s biggest banks and consulting firms are working hard to set up policy and case studies to be ready when the rest of the world flips the switch, and Bitcoin becomes as big the hype suggests.  If you want to buy some, it’s pretty easy. But first let’s make sure you have somewhere safe to keep it. So we created this how to buy bitcoin guide for you as non legal or investment advice but a basic guideline for some important pointers.
    How To Buy Bitcoin
    geralt / Pixabay

    First, the Wallet


    You’ll need a wallet. Not a nice leather billfold, because Bitcoins are not physical. There are no coins and no paper bills involved. It is all virtual. The Bitcoin wallet is an app that you can download to your phone, and your computer. It contains two 16-digit passwords: one is called a public key, and the other is a private key.
    Quite simply, when you buy Bitcoin, your wallet sends your public key information to the vendor, the same way you would enter a credit card number into an online form. The public key tells the vendor’s app where to send the Bitcoin amount. The private key is the password you employ to confirm the transaction from your end. This one-time code is reviewed by the computers on the blockchain, who then approve the transaction unanimously as representing your receipt of a certain amount of Bitcoin.  Once the code has been accepted by the computers on the blockchain, your wallet’s information will say it has some Bitcoin in it, and then the code is sealed permanently into the next block on the chain.
    If you are a casual user looking to buy a small amount of Bitcoin, a software app-based wallet will be ideal. But there are actually four wallet types available:
    • Software wallets. These are apps to be used from your mobile device.
    • Online bitcoin wallets are hosted online and can be accessed from any device. That’s different from having the app on your phone. It’s online, like a web page.
    • Hardware wallets are physical devices with enhanced security, designed for those doing large transactions.
    • Paper wallets – these are files that you print out, and which contain the required private key data.

    If your interest is light use, the most highly rated wallet apps are: BreadWallet (iOS), Copay, Mycelium (Android), and Airbitz, which actually comes with Starbucks discounts.

    How to buy bitcoin and where to find it


    Most Bitcoin sales are done through currency exchanges and specialist Bitcoin traders, as opposed to major banks. In the U.S., the two most popular exchanges are Coinbase and Kraken. Like most other exchanges, purchases are usually done via your bank account, so it is important before connecting up, to ensure your Bitcoin exchange has a solid reputation.
    Other services like BitQuick do the sale through an escrow service in which you wire cash to your BitQuick account (as opposed to them accessing your regular account).
    Be aware that any currency exchange will charge service fees, and there will usually also be mining fees from the blockchain miners who approve your transaction. These fees are not huge, as compared to banks or international cash wire services, but they are still fees.
    Certain banks, like Bank of America and Wells Fargo in the U.S. and RBC in Canada are starting to accept Bitcoin, but they, too, require access to your bank account.
    The reason why trading houses and banks insist on direct access to an account is to limit the potential for fraud. Because of the discrepancy between credit cards transaction times and Bitcoin processing times, it is possible for less scrupulous people to make a Bitcoin purchase on a credit card and then run a chargeback before the blockchain completes it approval process. This is obviously not good for the credit card companies. If you choose to use a credit card, your purchase will be processed as a cash advance, not a purchase.

    How to buy bitcoin, other options for purchases


    Another interesting way to buy Bitcoin is your local convenience store or gas station. This is a three-way relationship between a Bitcoin broker, a local business with a terminal, and you. As strange as this may sound, it is predicated on the fact that Bitcoin is independent of any bank, meaning you should be able to transact your money anywhere. Here’s how this works:
    A participating Bitcoin broker establishes a relationship with small outlets like gas stations and convenience stores that are equipped with a wire transfer merchant terminal. This same terminal might also be used for cash payments to wire services like Western Union, or even to lottery offices. You pay the convenience store $100, for example, and the clerk enters it into the terminal. In return, you receive a slip of paper with a unique serial number on it. This is your proof of payment of $100, which may be worth approximately $96 in Bitcoin after fees. You return to the website of the Bitcoin broker and enter that number, along with your wallet’s public key. The broker then transfers $94 or so worth of Bitcoin (again another service fee) to your wallet. (The fees in this example are subject to change).
    This local approach works, but it is up to you, the consumer, to do some research to find out which of your local Bitcoin brokers works with convenience stores, and how the experience has been for others.

    Final point


    Keep your Bitcoin information safe. If you lose your wallet, either by losing your phone or forgetting the password, those Bitcoins will be lost. Since there is no bank insuring your deposits, there is no recourse.
    Bitcoin as a currency has a long way to go before it becomes common. If you are a serious investor looking to profit off its rise in value, make sure to store your accounts with hardware or paper wallets. If you are looking for some smaller-size fun, buying some Bitcoin is a great practical education on the future of money.
    The post How To Buy Bitcoin: A Guide For Beginners appeared first on ValueWalk. Read more StevePrentice
  • “Free Ross” Account Glitch Latest Symptom of Coinbase Woes, par Michael Scott, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Bitcoin Magazine :: RSS
    rosscb.jpg

    The “Free Ross” campaign which raises funds for jailed Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht experienced a glitch last week, renewing concerns about the stability of the digital currency exchange Coinbase. This occurrence comes on the heels of Ulbricht’s latest appeal for release which was just denied in May.

    A Twitter message from @free_ross dated June 15, 2017, created a bit of a social media firestorm. In it, his mother Lyn Ulbricht wrote:
    <script async src='https://bitcoinmagazine.com/platform.twitter.com/widgets.js' charset="utf-8"></script>

    Later that day, Ulbricht confirmed that the Free Ross account on Coinbase had been re-enabled. In an email to Bitcoin Magazine, she remarked “I think they responded promptly because of the uproar on social media. We are not so sure of their explanation of why it happened and are looking into the record on that now.”
    Later she responded, “They [Coinbase] said it was an automatic security response.”
    The Free Ross account does not store all of its bitcoins on Coinbase. Rather, it was established as a convenient way to convert donations into U.S. dollars.
    This recent hiccup comes as Coinbase, perhaps the world’s most popular bitcoin exchange, continues to face a litany of complaints from users. There have been numerous reports that the exchange shutters user accounts without reason or notice.  It has been alleged that Coinbase frequently flags and freezes accounts when even the smallest hint of suspicious activity is suspected. In some cases, there have been complaints among users saying that any coins they had in the account at the time were never returned to them.
    In a Coinbase blog post on June 4, CEO Brian Armstrong acknowledged the need for changes to address the negative customer experiences, which he attributed to growing demands on the Coinbase system.
    We’re storing customer funds, and I can understand how incredibly frustrating (and scary) it is when an issue arises and you can’t get a prompt response. We haven’t done enough to keep up with the growth, and we’re taking steps now to correct it. - Brian Armstrong

     Armstrong also set forth a plan to address some of the scaling solutions that Coinbase plans to implement later this year, including faster customer support response times and a new system to flag “risky withdrawals.” He indicated that the company has hired a consultant to consult on scaling and the introduction of phone support.
    Bitcoin Magazine reached out to both Coinbase and Armstrong about the company’s continuing service woes in light of the problems with the FreeRoss account. In response to our questions, Megan Hernbroth from the strategic communications department at Coinbase, stated, “This account was initially blocked due to automated security feature because of the links between this account and a previously compromised one,” and referred us to the following Tweet:
    <script async src='https://bitcoinmagazine.com/platform.twitter.com/widgets.js' charset="utf-8"></script>

    She also referred us back to the June 4th blog post in lieu of comment on Coinbase’s other service concerns.

    Regulatory Challenges and a New Hire


    In a recent announcement on its blog, Coinbase announced that former federal prosecutor Kathryn Haun would be joining its Board of Directors. Haun was the U.S. Department of Justice’s first-ever digital currency head and was tasked with addressing financial, cyber-crime, gang and national security concerns.
    Among the investigations that she oversaw were those that led to the prosecution of the two federal agents accused of theft and corruption in the Silk Road case. Both are currently serving prison sentences.
    Reports that Haun would be assisting Coinbase did not sit well with many in the Bitcoin community. And the fact that her appointment occurred the day after the Free Ross account was suspended was a hot topic of discussion on sites like Reddit.
    It should be noted that given its rise in prominence as the leading bitcoin exchange in the U.S., Coinbase has been experiencing a flurry of regulatory scrutiny over the past 18 months. According to the Coinbase site, it is registered as a Money Services Business with FinCEN; as such, it is subject to stringent anti-money laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) compliance requirements in addition to state laws.
    In a major development which occurred last year on this front, the IRS requested a John Doe summons as part of a bitcoin probe, seeking to identify and capture Coinbase user information in the U.S. associated with someone who conducted transactions in the digital currency.
    On the regulatory front, a bill being pursued in Congress called the “Combating Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing, and Counterfeiting Act of 2017” seeks to, among other things, further target exchanges like Coinbase under the strictures of anti-money laundering regulations. Moreover, Congress is considering including cryptocurrency holdings over $10,000 on the list of reporting requirements when travelers are entering or leaving the U.S.
    When asked about Coinbase amid this onslaught of regulatory activity, Perry Woodin, a computer engineer and CEO of the blockchain governance company, Node40 had this to say: “I suspect that Coinbase is suffering from the growing pains of being the leader in a rapidly evolving industry. Add to that growth, a changing states-based regulatory scene that requires Coinbase to jump through ever changing hoops, and customer service is bound to suffer. Coinbase has reported issues where Wyoming, Hawaii and Minnesota have overly burdensome regulations, forcing the exchange to withdraw from those states.”  

    Issues Persist


    As Armstrong asserted in his blog post, some of the technical and service issues facing Coinbase may be attributed to the increasing demand they’re facing amid the meteoric rise taking place in the cryptocurrency world. Nevertheless, concerns abound about frequent outages that throttle buy and sell orders, often for extended periods of time. There have also been instances during these major price movement periods where the Coinbase site couldn’t be accessed at all.
    Lamented libertarian singer and songwriter Tatiana Moroz: “I have had countless problems with Coinbase, from repeated errors on the platform to it not being accessible when I’ve needed to sell or buy bitcoin most. It's not a few isolated incidents; it's ongoing.”
    Moroz went on to say that Coinbase’s customer service has basically been nothing short of a “nightmare.”
    “It makes me feel completely uncared for as a customer and I know I'm not the only one. I have sent service tickets that take 2-3 weeks for them to reply to. Their fees are also high. And there never seems to be a way to reach a human, which is very scary when you have your money there.”  
    The Reddit post seems to underscore the frustration experienced by Moroz and scores of others regarding user experience snafus.
    “Unfortunately, the subpar tier one support can cause angst that rapidly spreads across social media,” said Woodin. “I don’t know what recourse there is for users who have lost coins. I do hope that, as Coinbase continues to grow and expand, that they put more emphasis on customer support and service. Doing so will save Coinbase and their customers from unnecessary headaches.”

    Lack of Options


    Woodin also points to a frequently overlooked, central issue in this discussion, namely, the lack of  consumer choice and competition in terms of exchanges currently in the markets. He attributes this in large part to expense and regulatory climate factors associated with launching a new exchange.
    “No doubt, it can be prohibitively expensive to meet the licensing requirements imposed by many states. Movement of fiat currency is highly regulated which means any competition coming to market would have a high financial burden for compliance. I do not see this changing anytime soon.”
    Moroz echoed this notion, surmising that Coinbase’s troubles are in part regulatory in nature: “What's troubling is that the regulations and other barriers to entry allow it to operate as a monopoly essentially, and it's difficult to avoid using them if convenience is a factor. I’d like to also note that they seem to have a presence at so few of the major conferences. Frankly, this makes me wonder about how supportive they are of the Bitcoin community in the first place.”  
    Libertarian economist and free-market advocate Jeffrey Tucker, in conversation Bitcoin Magazine, also weighed in with a final thought: “The fact is that there should be tens of thousands of exchanges. And there were scores that were already opening up before government intervened and forced all of these regulations on everybody. And, of course, that created a cartelized market with only a handful of players dominating everything. That allows them to exploit their customers by raising rates, by providing inferior service, not innovating. Currently, the exchange business is a non-competitive sector that, in my view, is a disaster for Bitcoin.”

    The post “Free Ross” Account Glitch Latest Symptom of Coinbase Woes appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine. Read more Michael Scott
  • Bitcoin Miners Are Signaling Support for the New York Agreement: Here’s What that Means, par Aaron van Wirdum, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Bitcoin Magazine :: RSS
    Miners Are Signaling Support for the New York Agreement: Here’s What that Means.

    As of today, over 80 percent of miners (by hash power) are including the letters “NYA” in the blocks they mine. This follows the publication of letters (translation) in which a group of Chinese Bitcoin companies — notably including most mining pool operators — announced that they would signal support for “the New York Agreement.”

    Here’s what this means in the context of Bitcoin Core’s scaling roadmap, the upcoming BIP148 user activated soft fork (UASF) on August 1, 2017, and Bitcoin’s broader scaling debate.

    The New York Agreement


    The New York Agreement, sometimes referred to as “the Silbert Accord” or “SegWit2x,” is a scaling agreement forged within a significant group of international Bitcoin companies and published just before the Consensus 2017 conference in New York last May. Based on this agreement, a fork of the Bitcoin Core software client is being developed under the name “BTC1.” BTC1 developer Jeff Garzik announced the alpha release of this software last week.
    While technical specifics for BTC1 are still being worked out, it seems that rollout of the New York Agreement essentially consists of two stages.
    The first stage regards deployment of Segregated Witness (SegWit), the backwards compatible protocol upgrade originally proposed by the Bitcoin Core development team. With 80 percent has power support, BTC1 should actually trigger activation of the SegWit implementation embedded in Bitcoin Core clients and should also be compatible with BIP148 clients as long as activation happens before August 1st. With BTC1’s “official” release date set for July 21st, this should be possible.
    The second stage concerns the deployment of the hard fork itself, which is not backwards compatible with older Bitcoin clients. This hard fork would double Bitcoin’s “base block size limit” to two megabytes, which combined with the block size limit increase brought by Segregated Witness should make for a total maximum of eight megabytes of block space. This is scheduled for exactly three months after activation of the first stage. So if the “BIP148 deadline” of August 1st is met, the second stage should go into effect before November 1, 2017.
    Through letters published shortly after the announcement of the BTC1 alpha software, Chinese mining pool operators confirmed their intent to honor the New York Agreement. Additionally, they announced to include the letters “NYA” in their “coinbase strings.” That’s what we’ve been seeing today.
    So what does this “NYA” string actually mean?

    Signaling and Signaling


    For each block miners mine, they get to send themselves one transaction that includes brand new bitcoins. This is called the “coinbase transaction.” (Not to be confused with the company “Coinbase.”) Like all transactions, this transaction can include a little bit of extra data that actually has nothing to do with the transaction itself. This is what miners sometimes use to “signal” information to the rest of the world.
    But broadly speaking, there are really two types of “signaling.”
    The first type is signaling support. This requires that actual Bitcoin software has been written to monitor the signals and, once these signals reach some kind of threshold, something actually activates in all of these Bitcoin clients. For example, code for the Segregated Witness soft fork as included in Bitcoin Core clients, will enforce the Segregated Witness rules once 95 percent of newly mined blocks include a specific piece of data in the coinbase strings. If that happens, all these nodes will actually reject transactions and blocks that break the SegWit rules. (Edit: It should be noted that SegWit signaling doesn't use the coinbase transaction for signaling, but the block header.)
    The second type is signaling intent. As opposed to signaling support, signaling intent doesn’t actually do anything on a technical level. Rather, it's literally miners sending a message to the world, which has in the past, for example, been used to state a preference for a potential scaling solution. (While miners can also do this through letters or blog posts, coinbase signaling cannot possibly be faked, so it’s a bit more reliable.)
    The recent “NYA” signaling is of the second type. It doesn’t actually trigger any code, but it instead lets the world know that the miners intend to support the New York Agreement. Specifically, they seem to indicate that they will be signaling support for the New York Agreement once the BTC1 client is officially released: presumably by July 21st, or at least in time for August 1st. (Though earlier is possible, too.)
    But notably, most miners are not signaling support yet — even though it’d be possible to activate SegWit through existing activation methods implemented in Bitcoin Core or BIP148 clients straight away.

    Hard Fork


    The technical specifics for BTC1 are still being worked out, and that’s especially true for the hard fork part of it.
    Right now, it seems that signaling support for SegWit2x should also trigger the hard fork code to be implemented in all BTC1 clients — but only three months down the road. So if SegWit activates before August, BTC1 users should start accepting, and potentially mining, “base blocks” larger than one megabyte by November. In fact, the first base block on the BTC1-chain, the “cut-off block,” will likely even have to be bigger than one megabyte.
    But it’s far from certain that most non-BTC1 clients will follow this chain. Most notably, the odds of Bitcoin Core — currently the dominant client on the network — adopting the SegWit2x hard fork seem slim. None of the regular Bitcoin Core contributors were part of the New York Agreement, none of them support it, and contentious hard forks have so far not been implemented by the Bitcoin Core development team, more or less as a matter of policy. And even if the Bitcoin Core development team does merge the hard fork code, it would require all users to upgrade to this new version, which is probably even less likely.
    As such, if BTC1 users — such as the New York Agreement signatories — follow through and actually run the software three months after the soft fork, there will likely be a split in the Bitcoin network. Some nodes will follow a chain with bigger blocks, some will stick to smaller blocks, and there would effectively be two different coins with a shared history.
    But it is too soon to say how such a scenario will play out exactly —  or if it will happen in the first place. Three months is a long time in Bitcoin terms and, in the end, neither written agreements, nor signaling intent are binding on a Bitcoin protocol level.

    The post Bitcoin Miners Are Signaling Support for the New York Agreement: Here’s What that Means appeared first on Bitcoin Magazine. Read more Aaron van Wirdum
  • PSD2, Open Banking, APIs the customer, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Finextra Research Online banking channel :: RSS
    Hamish Thomas, Partner, EMEIA Payments Leader, EY, talks about PSD2, Open Banking and the wider imp... Read more
  • gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#32, par gavinandresen, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: gavinandresen’s Activity :: RSS
    Jun 20, 2017 gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#32 Miners do not intentionally create expensive-to-validate blocks; it is against their financial interest. The dangers of adding Yet Another Arbitrar… Read more gavinandresen
  • gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#29, par gavinandresen, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: gavinandresen’s Activity :: RSS
    Jun 20, 2017 gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#29 If there aren't enough transactions in the mempool (e.g. you're on testnet) the CreateNewBlock code could add a bunch of zero-value OP_RETURN outpu… Read more gavinandresen
  • gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#32, par gavinandresen, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: gavinandresen’s Activity :: RSS
    Jun 20, 2017 gavinandresen commented on issue btc1/bitcoin#32 Non-segwit transactions larger than 100K are already non-standard (segwit transactions can be up to 400K) and won't be relayed or mined. I think it… Read more gavinandresen
  • [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges, par Ofir Beigel, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: 99 Bitcoins :: RSS
    The post [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges appeared first on 99 Bitcoins.
    The recent altcoin boom has brought in a lot of new cryptocurrency traders and many people are looking for quick, cost effective ways to buy altcoins like Ethereum, Litecoin, Monero and others. In today’s post I want to cover a relatively new type of altcoin exchange. It’s something I call “instant” cryptocurrency exchanges. These exchanges [...] Read more Ofir Beigel
  • [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop RSS :: RSS
    The post [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges appeared first on 99 Bitcoins.
    The recent altcoin boom has brought in a lot of new cryptocurrency traders and many people are looking for quick, cost effective ways to buy altcoins like Ethereum, Litecoin, Monero and others. In today’s post I want to cover a relatively new type of altcoin exchange. It’s something I call “instant” cryptocurrency exchanges. These exchanges [...] Read more
  • [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop - bitcoin :: RSS
    The post [Review] Changelly VS ShapeShift – The “Instant” Cryptocurrency exchanges appeared first on 99 Bitcoins.
    The recent altcoin boom has brought in a lot of new cryptocurrency traders and many people are looking for quick, cost effective ways to buy altcoins like Ethereum, Litecoin, Monero and others. In today’s post I want to cover a relatively new type of altcoin exchange. It’s something I call “instant” cryptocurrency exchanges. These exchanges [...] Read more
  • Regulated European Bitcoin Exchange Bitstamp Adds Litecoin Trading, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    The move comes as Litecoin is trading at an all time high, with the LTC/USD exchange rate now above $50. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Regulated European Bitcoin Exchange Bitstamp Adds Litecoin Trading, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    The move comes as Litecoin is trading at an all time high, with the LTC/USD exchange rate now above $50. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Dash Price Reaches $200 for First Time, Market Cap Above $1.5 Billion, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    The price of privacy-focused cryptocurrency Dash increased by 100% over the last three months. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Dash Price Reaches $200 for First Time, Market Cap Above $1.5 Billion, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    The price of privacy-focused cryptocurrency Dash increased by 100% over the last three months. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Blockchain Startup Colu Launches ‘Local Pound, East London’, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    Colu is nearing 50,000 users worldwide, spending almost $1 million at small businesses through the app. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Blockchain Startup Colu Launches ‘Local Pound, East London’, par Avi Mizrahi, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Cryptocurrency| Finance Magnates :: RSS
    Colu is nearing 50,000 users worldwide, spending almost $1 million at small businesses through the app. Read more Avi Mizrahi
  • Three Technical Requirements to Connect Blockchains Without a Token, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop RSS :: RSS
    Since I see a lot of downsides to having one large uber-blockchain connecting all others, I will focus on a token-LESS solution. This would have several advantages. Read more
  • Three Technical Requirements to Connect Blockchains Without a Token, 20 June 2017

    Tuesday 20 June 2017 :: Alltop - bitcoin :: RSS
    Since I see a lot of downsides to having one large uber-blockchain connecting all others, I will focus on a token-LESS solution. This would have several advantages. Read more
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